16/05/2017 Contextual Studies

Conclusion

The biologist and primatologist Frans de Waal says, “To endow animals with human emotions has long been a scientific taboo. But if we do not, we risk missing something fundamental, about both animals and us.” (De Waal 2015) Even though we still inherit animal instinct, it seems difficult for us to find and identify the way the old animal part of our mind generates its forms of sight, shape, sound and movement, because our current lifestyle does not necessitate physical interaction by instinct requires without our intelligence. Yet we revere the natural world and are seduced by characteristics we no longer see in ourselves, such as fierceness, instinctive, purity. Those works visually, emotionally and intellectually explore this overlap that exists across knowledge, cultures, along histories, and within societies. To bring animal forms into our art and our contemporary lives helps us acknowledge that a connection with animals is an important part of feeling ‘whole’ to ourselves.

09/05/2017 Contextual Studies

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Modern art is one type of art that can express animal instinct. The image below is an elephant, named Elsa, painting on a canvas. The work is using animals being to help people understand that the important point of modern art is the differences between controlled and uncontrolled. It is true that animals can create an uncontrolled works, such as sculpture, painting, and dance. The point is that there is a subtle difference between the uncontrolled acts of painting by an animal and what appears, at first sight, to be an equally uncontrolled result from a human. This subtle difference is the key to understanding modern art. The point is that there is a subtle difference between the uncontrolled acts of painting by an animal and what appears, at first sight, to be an equally uncontrolled result from a human. This subtle difference is the key to understanding modern art. (Hollins 2010) More specifically, the subtle difference reveals that the unique human ability of creating our own sense of order and controlling over perception has driven us to override our animal senses. That is also the reason why people can distinguish an abstract painting created by animals from what appears to be an identical result by human being. For instance, when animal like chimpanzee or elephant paints an abstract it does not impose any sense of order or control over their actions.

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Elsa, an Indonesian elephant who loves to paint. Photo © Alex Melamid, AEACP. 2009 Reproduced with permission of David Ferris.

On the contrary, human being must work to stop their mind imposing order and control if they want to do the same thing. In order to create an abstract painting people have to work in the opposite way to the animal mind. The ‘ability’ to find such images where they do not exist is an example of how our intelligent perception creates an additional level of recognition around all we see and do. Our intelligence does this to stop our old sensation of animal instinct emerging into our mind.

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A fur covered cup. Meret Oppenheim. © 2009. Digital image, The Museum of Modern Art, New York/Scala, Florence

This Surrealist object was inspired by a conversation between Oppenheim and artists Pablo Picasso and Dora Maar at a Paris cafe. It was a good example to explain how animal instinct works during creating artwork. “The work takes advantage of differences in the varieties of sensual pleasure: fur may delight the touch but it repels the tongue. And a cup and spoon, of course, are made to be put in the mouth.”(MOMA 2004) This work shows how the artist gave up his human being and intelligent to just used animal instinct to create the “A fur covered cup”.

To experience objects and events in a frame of mind that would allow us to know them through our old ‘animal’ instincts would require our intelligence to look at our surroundings as if we had never seen them before (Hollins 2010). We can even through it’s shapes, colors, and sounds from our inner hearts. Only beginning to inherit and understand the instinct of animals, could we sense objects and events with an inner awareness. What’s more, in previous history, the instinct of animals was that we were born with. It doesn’t need to be formatted for learning. When you truly and intelligently understand what animal instinct is, another new perspective will emerge for you. This view is the key in modern art, but we often lose it. The instinct of animals as one of forms of traditional representation should be explored by us. Only in this way, could we discover the true meaning of modern art.

Modern art is one type of art that can express animal instinct. The image below is an elephant, named Elsa, painting on a canvas. The work is using animals being to help people understand that the important point of modern art is the differences between controlled and uncontrolled. It is true that animals can create an uncontrolled works, such as sculpture, painting, and dance. The point is that there is a subtle difference between the uncontrolled acts of painting by an animal and what appears, at first sight, to be an equally uncontrolled result from a human. This subtle difference is the key to understanding modern art. The point is that there is a subtle difference between the uncontrolled acts of painting by an animal and what appears, at first sight, to be an equally uncontrolled result from a human. This subtle difference is the key to understanding modern art. (Hollins 2010) More specifically, the subtle difference reveals that the unique human ability of creating our own sense of order and controlling over perception has driven us to override our animal senses. That is also the reason why people can distinguish an abstract painting created by animals from what appears to be an identical result by human being. For instance, when animal like chimpanzee or elephant paints an abstract it does not impose any sense of order or control over their actions.

On the contrary, human being must work to stop their mind imposing order and control if they want to do the same thing. In order to create an abstract painting people have to work in the opposite way to the animal mind. The ‘ability’ to find such images where they do not exist is an example of how our intelligent perception creates an additional level of recognition around all we see and do. Our intelligence does this to stop our old sensation of animal instinct emerging into our mind.

02/05/2017 Contextual studies

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Charmed.©2017KATECLARKSTUDIO,sculpture, 2015.

Animal realm has not only provide inspiration to us by its shape, color, surface texture in contemporary art, but also had carry a communicative power that relates to a more civilized state of being. There are many works have used more creative way, instead of using exterior of animal to explore animal world, even human being. For instance, Kate Clark is a sculptor. Her works are really emotionally because she has made hybrid sculpture which combine human’s face and animal’s body—ones that are at once foreign and familiar—as a vehicle to elicit compassion and prompt a connection between the human and animal worlds. Her works expose discussions about what it means to live in a world increasingly segregated from nature (Kim Carpenter 2015). When viewers are looking at her sculptures, they are faced with a lifelike combination of human and animal that investigates which characteristics separate them within the animal kingdom, and more importantly, which relate

themselves.

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Detail.©2017KATECLARKSTUDIO,sculpture, 2011.

There is another work, which created by Miguel Vallinas, express animal instinct through photography. This whimsical photo series sees various animals dressed in contemporary outfits, posing as typical human models would. The clothes appear to match their personalities, acting as a true second skin. “Our clothes reveal what is locked within us,” Vallinas suggests. “Certain people,” he goes on, “wear certain clothes to differentiate themselves from others. But when they meet people dressed the same way, they form herds. Our clothing is like the fur of animals” (Epstein 2014).

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‘Roe Deer – Portrait Number Three’ Matte photographic print

Through his work we can image different type of animals’instinct, while it also provided space to viewers to let them think what instinct is hidden in themselves.

25/04/2017 Contextual Studies

How is animal instinct expressed through art?

 writing introduction

In an increasingly mechanized, industrial, and now technological world, the interspecies bond that touches us most deeply is, animal instinct. While it may not be realistic to think we can decipher the obscure vocabulary of gesture, animation, expression, and sound of the animal kingdom, most of us believe that it can teach us something.(Busch 2014) The idea of writing this essay is to explore how is animal instinct is expressed through art. It is usual to see that animal behavior and intelligence is reflected in the way animals are represented in contemporary art and design. The animal world has always had a presence in art and design. It may be a celebration of beauty. Animal forms offer a vast and rich resource for shape, color, surface texture. Indeed, the emerging visibility of the animal world in art and signals something more than a revived interest in the figurative perhaps a renewed curiosity, a changed appreciation and most of all, a thriving sense of the imaginative when it comes to animal instincts. (Busch 2014) In this essay, I would like to show how animal instinct works with different art form, such as fine art, photography and sculptures. And what is the way and technique that artists use in their art works to translate animal instinct. I am doing this project because it relates to my final project which is animal instinct, and it helps me with my specialism fashion promotion.

28/03/2017 Contextual Studies

Tittle for the final project

Questions:

  1. How animal instinct represents human nature?
  2. How animal instinct be shown in art form?
  3. Is animal behaviour and intelligence reflected in the way animals are represented in contemporary art and design?
  4. How do artists use art to explore animal instinct?

Before setting the questions, I have done some research of animal instinct and different art forms that represent animal instinct. Such as, photography, film (document), and graphic. I also have read one article that talking about humanity and animal. That gave the first idea of the tittle for the final main project. “How animal instinct represents human nature?” While, my final project has not much more things that focus on human nature. Still it is a interesting question for me. Human nature and animal instinct are related in some side that they could be represent by each other. Also human is the most intelligent animal, that human revolute in order to fit the environment. Even they develop their ability and change the situation they lived, from fitting the nature to leading the nature. While it seems the animal intinction is the function of human development.  Then I have looked the others, and I have two more questions. One’ is “How animal instinct be shown in art form?”, and the other one is “Is animal behavior and intelligence reflected in the way animals are represented in contemporary art and design?” These two questions are quite similar and the purpose are focus on how animal be represented in art. Due to that, my final main project will by shown by photography. So I would like to do some researches about photographers who has the works that relate to animal , even more deeply to animal instinct and behaviors.

It is a good idea that provided by my classmate “feral-human”. It give me clearer outline that how to find the instinct. While I need think about more that how can I relate to my specialism.

21/03/2017 Contextual Studies

Today, I used the handout Library Database Information to do more researches of my final main project. It is really useful. Firstly, I surf on http://www.jstor.org. Jstor is an Academic online database that allows you to search through journals and books. Depend on my FMP theme I have searched animal instinct in the website, and I found a really useful resource, which named “instinct” and is a part of a book called Themes in Transition. The brief idea of the resource is talking about the study of instinct. How people find and learn animal instinct. Firstly, they have a over all idea:”The complex behavior of animals, pre cisely adapted to their needs yet not intelligent, directed toward evident ends yet not guided by foresight, had long given philos ophers an inexhaustible source of moral notions and intellectual conundrums. But today “instinct” belongs to zoology and psychol ogy. What advances in understanding can we claim from this change?” (S.A.Barnett 1963)

They through the complex behaviour and sound of animals to stereotype and identify animals. “when one has seen the courtship of one pair of great crested grebes (Podiceps cristatus), one may feel one has seen the lot. The web of a spider, the song of a bird, the combat between two fighting fish?each is characteristic of the species and as standardized as the structures used by tax onomists for identification. Moreover, these performances are com monly triggered off by patterns of stimulation of equal fixity. The ecstatic zig-zag dance of the mating male stickleback ( Gasterosteus aculeatus) can be set going by a fragment of wood with a swollen belly; his postures of territorial defense may be induced by the dis tant passage of a post office van painted the same red as a rival’s” (S.A.Barnett 1963)

Hence a not wholly false account of animal behavior can be given, in which most actions are represented as having a machine like fixity: a stereotyped pattern of sights, sounds, odors or con tacts evokes a similarly uniform pattern of movements. Each activity fits the performer for its own habitat but none is adaptable to unusual conditions. Such a scheme may be almost appropriate for some of the lowlier members of the animal kingdom: the micro scopic larvae of oysters (Ostrea) or barnacles (such as Balanus) and many others are evidently guided to settlement by a few di rected responses12?the “forced movements” described by the grand father of mechanistic behaviorism, Jacques Loeb.13 But it will not do for even the more complex invertebrates, let alone the Chordates from fish upwards. (S.A.Barnett 1963) It gave me many side that I can research about animal instinct like using animal’s actions, sights, sounds, odours and so on.

Reference: Daedalus, Vol. 92, No. 3, Themes in Transition (Summer, 1963), pp. 564-580

07/03/2017 Contextual Studies

Three sources for my FMP

  1. Scientific research shows that many animals are very intelligent and have sensory and motor abilities that dwarf ours. Dogs are able to detect diseases such as cancer and diabetes and warn humans of impending heart attacks and strokes. Elephants, whales, hippopotamuses, giraffes, and alligators use low-frequency sounds to communicate over long distances, often miles. And bats, dolphins, whales, frogs, and various rodents use high-frequency sounds to find food, communicate with others, and navigate. (Marc Bekoff 2011) Many animals also display wide-ranging emotions, including joy, happiness, empathy, compassion, grief, and even resentment and embarrassment. It’s not surprising that animals—especially, but not only, mammals—share many emotions with us because we also share brain structures, located in the limbic system, that are the seat of our emotions. In many ways, human emotions are the gifts of our animal ancestors.(Marc Bekoff 2011) Stories about animals rescuing members of their own and other species, including humans, abound. They show how individuals of different species display compassion and empathy for those in need. (Marc Bekoff 2011)

http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/animal_instincts

2. For instance, a kangaroo rat instantly performs an automatic escape jump maneuver when it hears the sound of a striking rattlesnake, even if it has never encountered a snake before. Clearly, instinctive behaviors play an important role in survival, but our understanding of the forces that promote and guide their development in living animals is in fact quite limited. (2015 JRank)

In another classic study of instinctive behavior, ethologist Konrad Lorenz showed that baby ducks and geese, which are observed to closely follow their mother on their early forays away from the nest, could also be induced to follow a substitute. The baby birds would form an attachment to whatever individual was present as they opened their eyes and moved about after hatching, regardless of that individual’s species identity. Young birds that had thus imprinted on Lorenz followed him everywhere as they matured, and as adults, these birds were observed to court humans, in preference to members of their own species. (2015 JRank)

http://science.jrank.org/pages/3611/Instinct.html

3. The interspecies bond that touches us most deeply is, of course, the one between animals and humans. While it may not be realistic to think we can decipher the obscure vocabulary of gesture, animation, expression, and sound of the animal kingdom, most of us believe that it can teach us something. Just about anyone who has ever tried to train an animal faces the question not just of what they can learn from us, but of what we can learn from them. (Akin Busch, 2014)

http://web.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail/detail?vid=4&sid=22877d2b-67da-4d73-8b6e-5904f69d7991%40sessionmgr4009&hid=4104&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#AN=97749392&db=aft